Book Blurbs from the Man-eaters of Tsavo

A collection of the promotional text used which might get turned into a blog one day.

EditionYearBook Blurb
Macmillan1963A classic of lion hunting in British East Africa. Patterson was appointed by the Foreign Office to supervise the construction of the Uganda Railway, connecting that colony and the Kenyan interior with the coast at Mombasa. The project was held up for some time by lions attacking and killing numerous employees of the company. This book largely consists of the author’s account of dealing with the lions. The narrative includes much of interest on the construction of the railway itself, and numerous interesting observations of the country and its peoples. .
Fontana Collins1973Simba Simba! In 1898 the Uganda Railway was under construction. Gangs of labourers toiled in searing heat to overcome fearsome natural hazards. And the most terrifying were man-eating lions ….
J.H. Paterson was sent to join the construction party by the Foreign Office to enable the line to cross the East African rivers. But by the end of his tour, “Patterson Sahib” was the hero of the workers’ camps – the man who hunted down the fuller lions.
Macmillan1979As a record pf adventures pf Big Game hunting, Man-eaters of Tsavo has become a classic.In 1898 the author was sent by the Foreign Office to take charge of a section of the railway being built from Mombasa to the interior of Uganda. The ‘man-eaters’ referred to in the title were two lions who for nine months waged a savage though intermittent war against the railway and in the end actually succeeded in stopping work for a period of three week. Before Colonel Patterson had methodically hunted down and killed both lions that had managed to carry off and devour a number of workmen and the locals had come to believe they were not beasts but devils.
Besides this account there are also other stories of man-eating lions and of the hunting of other creatures on the African big game trails as well as considerable information on local tribes and customs. The authors own photographs decorate the text.
First published in 1907 and reprinted in 1947 this book enthralled three generations of readers aof adventure stories. Now reissued it will appeal both to those, young and old, who have a taste for endurance and quiet courage in the face of danger and all those with an interest in Africa and a world which is now so profoundly changed.
Pocket Books1996In 1898 John H. Patterson arrived in East Africa with a mission to build a railway bridge over the Tsavo River. What started out as a simple engineering problem, however, soon took on almost mythical proportions as Patterson and his mostly Indian workforce were systematically hunted by two man-eating lions over the course of several weeks. During that time, 100 workers were killed, and the entire bridge-building project ground to a halt. As if the lions weren’t enough, Patterson had to guard his back against his own increasingly hostile and mutinous workers as he set out to track and kill the man-eaters. This larger-than-life tale forms the basis of the entertaining film The Ghost and the Darkness, but for readers who want to know the whole–and true–story, The Man-Eaters of Tsavo comes straight from the great white-hunter’s mouth.Patterson’s account of the lions’ reign of terror and his own subsequent attempts to kill them is the stuff of great adventure, and his unmistakably Victorian manner of telling it only adds to the thrill. Consider this description of the aftermath of an attack by the lions: “.we at once set out to follow the brutes, Mr. Dalgairns feeling confident that he had wounded one of them, as there was a trail on the sand like that of the toes of a broken limb. we saw in the gloom what we at first took to be a lion cub; closer inspection, however, showed it to be the remains of the unfortunate coolie, which the man-eaters had evidently abandoned at our approach. The legs, one arm and half the body had been eaten, and it was the stiff fingers of the other arm trailing along the sand which had left the marks we had taken to be the trail of a wounded lion.” This classic tale of death, courage, and terror in the African bush is still a page-turner, even after all these years.
Lyons Press2004In 1898 John H. Patterson arrived in East Africa with a mission to build a railway bridge over the Tsavo River. Over the course of several weeks Patterson and his mostly Indian workforce were systematically hunted by two man-eating lions . In all, 100 workers were killed, and the entire bridge-building project was delayed. As well as being stalked by lions, Patterson had to guard his back against his own increasingly hostile and mutinous workers as he set out to track and kill the man-eaters. Patterson’s account of the lions’ reign of terror and his own attempts to kill them is the stuff of great adventure. Consider this description of the aftermath of an attack by the lions: “…we at once set out to follow the brutes, Mr. Dalgairns feeling confident that he had wounded one of them, as there was a trail on the sand like that of the toes of a broken limb…. we saw in the gloom what we at first took to be a lion cub; closer inspection, however, showed it to be the remains of the unfortunate coolie, which the man-eaters had evidently abandoned at our approach. The legs, one arm and half the body had been eaten, and it was the stiff fingers of the other arm trailing along the sand which had left the marks we had taken to be the trail of a wounded lion….” This classic tale of death, courage, and terror in the African bush is still a page-turner, even after all these years.
Filiuarian Publishing (USA)2007President Theodore Roosevelt, no mean hunter himself, once wrote, “I think that the incident of the Uganda man-eating lions, is the most remarkable account of which we have any record. It is a great pity that it should not be preserved in permanent form.” Now this timeless original account by Col. John Henry Patterson has been republished in this paperback edition. This is an excellent historical account of the African journey of Col. Patterson and his first-person account of interactions with man-eating lions, natives and other interesting stories in country now known as Kenya
SMK Books2022The Man-eaters of Tsavo and other East African Adventures is a book written by John Henry Patterson in 1907 about a pair of lions that he killed in Kenya, known as the Tsavo man-eaters. The book describes attacks by man-eating lions on the builders of the Uganda Railway in Tsavo, Kenya in 1898 and how the lions were eventually killed by Patterson. It was remarkable as nearly 140 people were killed by the man-eaters in less than a year before Patterson managed to kill them